4 Reasons the new USA Bat Standard is a good thing

By now you may have heard about the upcoming rule change going in to affect on January 1st, 2018. Little League, Pony, Babe Ruth, Cal Ripken, and almost every other youth baseball organization is adopting a new youth baseball bat standard: USABat Standard bats.

 

  1. The Integrity of the Game

Little League and Pony, the two largest youth baseball organizations by far, insist the change is needed for the “integrity of the game”.  What this means is since the development of high-end composite baseball bats in the early 2000s, bat manufacturers have been able to design and build bats with such large sweet spots and light swing weights, today’s youth baseball players have seen a dramatic increase in offense. The USABat Standard will decrease the allowable size of the barrel and sweet spot.

2. Big Barrel Bats For Little League

One great new thing about the new youth bat standard is that Little League will now allow baseball bats with a 2 5/8 inch diameter barrel (as well as 2 1/4″ still). Up until now, Little League has required the use of a 2 1/4 inch diameter barrel on all of their bats for youth baseball players. The USABat Standard will change this rule. One thing to keep in mind, however, is the sweet spot will be much smaller on the new bats than the sweet spot on the current big barrel bats available on the market.

3. Standardization

Under the new bat standard, Little League Baseball and Pony Baseball will use the same bats. The only reason you would ever need to get two different baths would be if you were playing travel baseball under USSSA rules.

4. Safety

While the organizations have come out and said that the change to the USABat Standards is not due to safety reasons, the simple fact is these bats will not perform as well as the current bats do. The decrease in barrel size as well as the potentially slower speeds off the bat should increase reaction time for the defense.

Rip It BBCOR Baseball Bat Banned From NCAA Play?

NCAA let out a press release on June 1st. 2011 that effectively bans the Prototype Rip It BBCOR baseball bat from College play.

The Right Bat Gets Better Little League Results

Little_League_Baseball_-_LogoYet, is a natural tendency for any Little League athlete to choose the heaviest bat in the pile to take to the batter’s box. However, a light bat is much simpler to control, which is often contrary to popular thinking. Professionals players often use a lighter bat because it is far easier to hit the ball farther and harder because the bat can be swung much faster.

The popularity of light bats has grown in recent years. Many sports bodies review the use of bats at all levels of play including high school, and the NCAA. They have incorporated rules prohibiting using bats that are too light. The reason for this is that any strong player could hit the ball so hard with a light bat, that they put college level infielder players at risk.

However, at the Little League level, playing with a light bat is considered a safe solution for players at nearly any level. Ideally, a lightweight bat for a Little League player allows him or her to produce the proper technique when swinging.

Contrary to popular belief, purchasing a bat that the young athlete will “grow into” simply does not produce the best results. Bats that are too heavy tend to help the Little League athlete develop bad habits, improper technique and can discourage participation. Whenever selecting the proper bat, always elect to choose the lighter one, especially at the Little League level.

The Materials

For as long as the game has been around, so have bats made out of wood. However, they tend to be heavy, are far less durable, and produce much less “pop” then what can be achieved through aluminum bats. Wooden bats should be left to the professionals and college players.

alumimum batsThe most common bats used in Little League are those that are fabricated out of aircraft-grade aluminum. Through advanced technology, bats are now able to be produced with walls that are much thinner and lighter in weight. Typically, expensive aluminum bats are built with stronger alloys to increase their durability and strength to produce a lightweight thin wall.

The more durability and strength in a Little League bat will minimize the potential for dents, especially during cold weather. Parents can expect to spend anywhere from thirty to hundreds of dollars for the right Little League bat.

Remember, the right bat gets better little league results!

Types of Baseball Bats for Adult League Play – The Basics

Different kinds of baseball batsAs more men and women become interested in joining adult league baseball teams, they often find themselves in need of purchasing the best baseball bat for their swing. However, because of all the available choices, exactly which types of baseball bats serve the player best? There are a myriad of choices and the answer can be confusing unless you know more about what is available.

So, let’s start with the basics of narrowing the choices for adult baseball bats.

Single Piece vs. Two-Piece Baseball Bats

Baseball bat manufacturers craft bats in a single piece and in two pieces that are bonded together. Bats that are made of a single piece have the same material in the overall design. The significant advantage to this type of design is that it provides a stiffer, stronger bat that only produces minimal flexibility. This is the ideal solution for any batter that does best with a quality stiff bat for hitting.

Alternatively, baseball bats that are manufactured as two individual pieces are held together in a bonding process. The barrel is separate from the handle. However, when bonded, they create a strategic point of contact that has the natural ability to produce a trampoline effect when the ball is hit. It also produces significantly less vibration because it is more flexible than a one-piece bat.

Composite vs. Alloy or Hybrids

Baseball bats that are composite are often two piece and manufactured using a mixture of fiberglass, graphite, carbon fiber, and at times Kevlar. Alternatively, bats manufactured from alloys are typically a one-piece design that uses either just aluminum or aluminum and other alloys to create a stronger unit. These types of alloy bats are thinner and extremely durable along with being highly responsive – a tradeoff for less vibration control.

However, it is important to understand that some adult leagues are banning bats that are manufactured using a composite barrel. This is due to the carbon fiber weave that produces a hotter response than many leagues allow. It is important to check the rules of the league before making the purchase of a bat with a composite barrel.

Using a hybrid composite baseball bat offers the best of both worlds between aluminum alloys and a composite barrel. It is typically a two-piece design that offers durability and flexibility.

There are players that still prefer wood baseball bats specifically designed for adults. They’re usually crafted out of composite wood, bamboo, maple or ash.

Tip: Before making the choice of which bat to purchase it is important to understand the bat’s BESR (Ball Exit Speed Ratio). This criteria indicates the exit speed of the ball combined with the pitch and the swing and is a factor in whether or not a baseball bat is legal for use.

So what is the best baseball bat for you? Leave us a comment on this blog and we will be happy to answer questions to help you determine the right bat based on your league, size and experience.

 

Bat Review: 2013 Rip It Prototype Air BBCOR

Rip It Prototype Air BBCOR Baseball BatThe 2013 Rip It Prototype Air BBCOR bat is their best this year.  The 2012 best bat from Rip It was the exceptional prototype 2.  Rip It continues to push the performance envelope even though they have not been in the market very long.

The newly introduced “Rip It Air” black bat with red lettering and gray accents is a sturdy bat and is all set to work. The feel awed me as soon as I picked it up. Four ounces were taken from the end and distributed all through the bat.  Rip It made the wall thinner at the business end of its Prototype Air BBCOR by channeling out grooves inside the barrel.

The Rip It Air has all the pop that was advertised. This bat has as much pop as anything else on the market, and I have tried all BBCOR bats. This bat pops all over, and it is one of the things that differentiate the Rip It Air from competitors.

It is a real ego builder in the batting cage.  Whether you hit the ball near the end or close to your hands, the ball flies off this baseball bat. Once you’ve square up the ball, you’ve sent out a challenge to the defense.

This bat is exceptionally well balanced when hitting the ball.  You can control the Rip It BBCOR all the way through the swing zone.  I was confident enough to hold on until the last moment and then drive the bat through the ball. Rip It has introduced a great hitting BBCOR bat to the market.

This bat feels and pops well, and the grip takes in the shock!  The little vibration in this single piece alloy bat really surprised me. It was fresh and enjoyable to use a bat that has hardly any vibration on badly hit balls. This innovative 2013 BBCOR from Rip It gives you all the features you could want on one the finest BBCOR bats for 2013.

The performance is the focus of Rip It! The excellent Rip It Prototype Air BBCOR is offered at the best price you will find.

2014 DeMarini NVS BBCOR Review

The 2014 DeMarini NVS Vexxum, along with the 2014 DeMarini Voodoo, is one of the two entirely new BBCOR bats Demarini is releasing for 2014 (CF6 BBCOR coming in Summer or Fall).

We received a couple of the new, 2014 DeMarini BBCOR Bats to sample and demo so we could share with you. The new Demarini NVS is balanced like no other BBCOR bat I have ever swung. The feel, and the pop off the barrel of the bat is great, better than the previous Vexxum. What this review is going to be about is the extreme balance of the new DeMarini NVS BBCOR.

As most of you know, the BBCOR standard allows for the baseball to come off of the barrel of the bat at a certain speed and not a MPH faster. Companies like DeMarini have several bats that meet this performance standard right at the limit, but that is not all there is to it. A BBCOR bat really has to be the complete package. Every part of a BBCOR bat must come together to make the best bat possible, not just “pop”. What the new, 2014 DeMarini NVS does is combine the pop and performance with the absolute lightest feeling, most balanced BBCOR bat ever conceived. I mean, it is shockingly light.

The 2014 NVS is so light and balanced that I really liked it at first. It felt good and was easy to swing. I was hitting hard line drives all over the field, with the occasional deep shot into the gap. However, you begin to realize that with the NVS, if you don’t put a charge into your swing, the bat is so light that it does not exactly do as much of the work for you as say, the 2014 Voodoo BBCOR would because of the end load it has.

Take that last sentence with a grain of salt, though. I did not notice any lack of power at all until I had taken about 70 swings in a row on the NVS BBCOR, so I was getting tired. I put down the NVS and picked up the 2014 Voodoo to get a comparison of the two, and I noticed the Voodoo hit the ball harder in my tired state because of the heavier end load, all I had to do was put the Voodoo in motion and the bat took care of the rest.

The reason this does not matter is you are never going to go up to the plate as gassed as I was. I am only making the above point to show you the difference between the two 2014 DeMarini BBCOR bats, they are designed this way for a reason. If you are a power hitter, or a guy who hits for average, the 2014 DeMarini Voodoo is an excellent bat, and definitely outperforms the 2013 Voodoo. If you are a younger player, or a guy that hits line drives, the 2014 DeMarini NVS is probably the best BBCOR bat for 2014 for you due to the light feel.

Special thanks to CheapBats.com who let us use their batting cage facility and demo bats for this BBCOR bat review.

2014 DeMarini Voodoo BBCOR Review

Recently we had a chance to swing the new 2014 DeMarini BBCOR bats. There are currently two new 2014 BBCOR bats, the 2014 DeMarini Voodoo and the 2014 Vexxum NVS; a CF6 BBCOR will follow in August, 2013.

DeMarini made some major changes to their two best selling BBCOR bats for 2014 (See our 2014 Vexxum NVS Review). So this was a fun bat review to do because we got to swing brand new bats that are about to hit the fields. Starting with the new Voodoo minus 3 ounce has a new knob and new composite in the handle. The barrel uses the X10 alloy in the barrel like previous versions, but the ring inside the barrel is moved down closer to the taper to help balance the bat out a little more than earlier versions of the BBCOR Voodoo. The Paradox composite is stronger than the older C6 composite, and gives the bat a stiffer feel, while eliminating vibration.

First impressions of the 2014 Voodoo BBCOR the feel. The new bat is still end loaded, but not as end loaded, so more hitters will be comfortable with this bat in their hands than ever before.

There is a new design for the knob of the new Voodoo called the RCK KNOB (Really Cool Knob). They thought about what shape would be most comfortable up against your hands during a hard swing. Cone shaped is not the best word, but that is what it reminds me of. It is actually more in between a cone shape and a normal knob, but we know we like it. I expect other companies to copy this and try to make knobs a little smoother to give the batter added comfort.

There is absolutely no vibration with the 2014 Voodoo. The bat swings solid. There is enough mass in the barrel of the bat to drive the ball hard, even on weak swings at the end of batting practice, if you can get the bat around, the baseball will jump off the barrel feeling solid.

The grip feels great; not too thin, not too thick. The Voodoo is the real deal. The new composite really does make a difference where it counts. The new Voodoo feels more like a one piece bat than a half and half bat, but benefits from the half and half construction in the respect that there is no vibration, unlike many one piece bats.

I really think the 2014 Voodoo is much better than the 2013 version, and I have no doubt the the new Voodoo will be one of the best BBCOR bats for 2014.

What Is The Best BBCOR Baseball Bat For 2013?

We want to know what you think. What BBCOR Bat is best for 2013? Vote for up to three 2013 BBCOR bats.

[poll id=”6″]

Marucci Elite BBCOR Bat – The New King of BBCOR Baseball Bats

The newest Marucci BBCOR bats is about to hit the baseball diamonds of America. A mass launch scheduled for January, 2013. The Marucci Elite BBCOR baseball bat is the latest BBCOR bat to come out of Marucci’s Baton Rouge, LA headquarters. The Elite BBCOR uses  and “aerospace grade composite material” in the handle and a combination of this same composite material and Marucci’s exclusive AZ3000 alloy in the bat barrel.

So, what we have here is a composite bat with mix of aluminum alloy and composite in the barrel of the baseball bat. That is essentially what the TPX Exogrid is from Louisville Slugger, except the Exogrid is almost entirely aluminum with a very small amount of composite inserts, where the Marucci Elite BBCOR is almost all composite with a little bit of aluminum.

Our initial hits on the Marucci Elite produced very good results. We very much liked the balance of the Elite, along with the pop, and the sound. While we did not get as much time with the Elite BBCOR as we wanted, we are sure this will be one of the best BBCOR bats for 2013.

Marucci Elite BBCOR Baseball Bat

Marucci Elite BBCOR Baseball Bat

Marucci Elite BBCOR Baseball Bat

Elite Marucci BBCOR Bat

Marucci Elite BBCOR Bat

Marucci Elite BBCOR Baseball Bat

 

Marucci Elite BBCOR Baseball Bat

Marucci Elite BBCOR Baseball Bat

 

2013 Demarini Voodoo vs 2012 DeMarini Voodoo

What is the difference between the 2012 DeMarini Voodoo and the 2013 DeMarini Voodoo?

Not much. The 2012 and 2013 DeMarini Voodoo BBCOR bats are visually different, but the only actual difference is a slight change to the alloy in the barrel that is supposed to give the bat a little more durability.

The 2013 looks more Ed Hardy than the 2012. Both Voodoo BBCOR bats use the exact same TR3 FLO Composite in the handle of the bat. The barrel of the 2012 uses the SC4 Alloy, while the 2012 uses the new DX10 alloy. Both bats have the exact same balance and the exact same barrel size as one another.

We recommend saving $160 and buying the 2012 DeMarini Voodoo BBCOR, then put that extra cash you saved into getting a new Wilson A2000 baseball glove!

H58A0154 H58A0155 H58A0156 2012 vs 2013 DeMarini Voodoo Baseball Bat BBCOR H58A0159

Marucci Issues Initial Response To NCAA Banning Certain Marucci BBCOR Bats

Marucci issued the response below:

NCAA RULING

June 6, 2012

Today we were notified that the 34-inch Cat 5² (MBC2) and 33 and 34-inch Black (MCB11) were decertified by the NCAA. We do not agree with this decision and believe the testing systems currently in place are flawed.

Our customers, both professional and amateur players, demand the very best and have come to expect a level of service from Marucci that is second to none.

In response to the NCAA’s ruling, we will provide all owners of the bats in question a comprehensive return program as proof of our commitment to you. Details on this program will be announced soon.

We thank you for your patience and support as we respond to the NCAA’s latest ruling and testing systems.

Brett Stohlton, CEO, Marucci Sports
Kurt Ainsworth, Co-Founder, Marucci Sports

http://maruccisports.com/ncaa-ruling/

Marucci Black BBCOR Baseball Bat Banned By NCAA – Marucci Files Lawsuit Against NCAA

BBCOR Marucci Black Baseball Bat Banned By NCAA

 

VIA ELECTRONIC MAIL
MEMORANDUM
June 6, 2012
TO: Head Baseball Coaches, Conference Commissioners, Compliance Officers
and Coordinators of Umpires.
FROM: Jeff Hurd, chair
Baseball Rules Committee
SUBJECT: Decertification of Marucci CAT-52 and Black bats.
This memo serves as the NCAA’s official notice of the decertification of the
Marucci CAT-52 34-inch and Black 33-inch and 34-inch models. Effective
immediately, these bats will not be allowed for use in any NCAA baseball
competition.
For ease of reference, photos of the bats are below:
The NCAA originally notified Marucci of this decertification in April, at which time Marucci filed suit against the NCAA. A temporary restraining order preventing the decertification of the bats was issued immediately and the district court ordered the proceedings to be kept under seal. On June 5, the district court
unsealed the case and dissolved the temporary restraining order against the
NCAA, thus permitting the NCAA to proceed with the decertifying of the bats.
This was the second time Marucci was notified of one of their bats being
decertified. In February, the Marucci Cat-52
33-inch model was found to be out of compliance and was decertified at that time. Team representatives are asked to check your team’s stock of bats and withhold
these bats if your team is in possession of any. Conference administrators are
asked to share this information with your umpires as well. If any of these bats are
attempted to be used during competition, it should be considered an illegal bat and
subject to NCAA Baseball Rule 1-12-b, (see the penalty section for procedures).
In 2011, the NCAA implemented a baseball bat testing standard called the
Baseball Bat Coefficient of Restitution (BBCOR) measurement. The decision to
implement the standard was rooted in preserving the integrity of the game and
ensuring the safety of student-athletes – as some non-wood bats hit the ball
significantly faster and farther than wood bats, they can create a significant
competitive advantage and also put players at greater risk of injury. The NCAA
certfies only those non-wood bats that perform like their wood counterparts to be
eligible for competition for this reason. All bats are tested prior to and throughout
the baseball season to ensure they are within the BBCOR standards. If a group of
a specific model of bats (three or more bats tested) are found to fail the
compliance test, they are decertified and removed from use in NCAA
competition.
For any questions on this decision, please contact Ty Halpin (Playing Rules,
thalpin@ncaa.org) or Cameron Schuh (Public and Media Relations,
cschuh@ncaa.org) at the NCAA. Thank you for your attention to this matter.
JH:clm
cc: Mr. Gene McArtor
Baseball Rules Committee
Selected NCAA Staff Members