4 Reasons the new USA Bat Standard is a good thing

By now you may have heard about the upcoming rule change going in to affect on January 1st, 2018. Little League, Pony, Babe Ruth, Cal Ripken, and almost every other youth baseball organization is adopting a new youth baseball bat standard: USABat Standard bats.

 

  1. The Integrity of the Game

Little League and Pony, the two largest youth baseball organizations by far, insist the change is needed for the “integrity of the game”.  What this means is since the development of high-end composite baseball bats in the early 2000s, bat manufacturers have been able to design and build bats with such large sweet spots and light swing weights, today’s youth baseball players have seen a dramatic increase in offense. The USABat Standard will decrease the allowable size of the barrel and sweet spot.

2. Big Barrel Bats For Little League

One great new thing about the new youth bat standard is that Little League will now allow baseball bats with a 2 5/8 inch diameter barrel (as well as 2 1/4″ still). Up until now, Little League has required the use of a 2 1/4 inch diameter barrel on all of their bats for youth baseball players. The USABat Standard will change this rule. One thing to keep in mind, however, is the sweet spot will be much smaller on the new bats than the sweet spot on the current big barrel bats available on the market.

3. Standardization

Under the new bat standard, Little League Baseball and Pony Baseball will use the same bats. The only reason you would ever need to get two different baths would be if you were playing travel baseball under USSSA rules.

4. Safety

While the organizations have come out and said that the change to the USABat Standards is not due to safety reasons, the simple fact is these bats will not perform as well as the current bats do. The decrease in barrel size as well as the potentially slower speeds off the bat should increase reaction time for the defense.

Combat Sports Bought By Bauer

It has just been announced that Combat has been purchased by Bauer.

Combat, a manufacturer of high end composite baseball bats and softball bats, after initial success with the Combat B1 youth bat and the Combat B2 youth baseball bat, suffered major financial losses as a result of the sudden rule change by Little League that effectively banned the use of several of Combat baseball bats.

At the time of the Little League composite bat rule change, Combat youth baseball bats were the most popular and best selling baseball bats for youth leagues. Combat made the decision to accept banned bats back from customers, a move that cost the company a fortune, but one that was looked upon in the baseball community as ‘doing the right thing’.

The purchase by such a dominant company in the hockey gear and lacrosse equipment world should give Combat the much needed funds and organization to once again compete with giants like Louisville Slugger, Easton and DeMarini.

Marucci Issues Initial Response To NCAA Banning Certain Marucci BBCOR Bats

Marucci issued the response below:

NCAA RULING

June 6, 2012

Today we were notified that the 34-inch Cat 5² (MBC2) and 33 and 34-inch Black (MCB11) were decertified by the NCAA. We do not agree with this decision and believe the testing systems currently in place are flawed.

Our customers, both professional and amateur players, demand the very best and have come to expect a level of service from Marucci that is second to none.

In response to the NCAA’s ruling, we will provide all owners of the bats in question a comprehensive return program as proof of our commitment to you. Details on this program will be announced soon.

We thank you for your patience and support as we respond to the NCAA’s latest ruling and testing systems.

Brett Stohlton, CEO, Marucci Sports
Kurt Ainsworth, Co-Founder, Marucci Sports

http://maruccisports.com/ncaa-ruling/

Marucci Black BBCOR Baseball Bat Banned By NCAA – Marucci Files Lawsuit Against NCAA

BBCOR Marucci Black Baseball Bat Banned By NCAA

 

VIA ELECTRONIC MAIL
MEMORANDUM
June 6, 2012
TO: Head Baseball Coaches, Conference Commissioners, Compliance Officers
and Coordinators of Umpires.
FROM: Jeff Hurd, chair
Baseball Rules Committee
SUBJECT: Decertification of Marucci CAT-52 and Black bats.
This memo serves as the NCAA’s official notice of the decertification of the
Marucci CAT-52 34-inch and Black 33-inch and 34-inch models. Effective
immediately, these bats will not be allowed for use in any NCAA baseball
competition.
For ease of reference, photos of the bats are below:
The NCAA originally notified Marucci of this decertification in April, at which time Marucci filed suit against the NCAA. A temporary restraining order preventing the decertification of the bats was issued immediately and the district court ordered the proceedings to be kept under seal. On June 5, the district court
unsealed the case and dissolved the temporary restraining order against the
NCAA, thus permitting the NCAA to proceed with the decertifying of the bats.
This was the second time Marucci was notified of one of their bats being
decertified. In February, the Marucci Cat-52
33-inch model was found to be out of compliance and was decertified at that time. Team representatives are asked to check your team’s stock of bats and withhold
these bats if your team is in possession of any. Conference administrators are
asked to share this information with your umpires as well. If any of these bats are
attempted to be used during competition, it should be considered an illegal bat and
subject to NCAA Baseball Rule 1-12-b, (see the penalty section for procedures).
In 2011, the NCAA implemented a baseball bat testing standard called the
Baseball Bat Coefficient of Restitution (BBCOR) measurement. The decision to
implement the standard was rooted in preserving the integrity of the game and
ensuring the safety of student-athletes – as some non-wood bats hit the ball
significantly faster and farther than wood bats, they can create a significant
competitive advantage and also put players at greater risk of injury. The NCAA
certfies only those non-wood bats that perform like their wood counterparts to be
eligible for competition for this reason. All bats are tested prior to and throughout
the baseball season to ensure they are within the BBCOR standards. If a group of
a specific model of bats (three or more bats tested) are found to fail the
compliance test, they are decertified and removed from use in NCAA
competition.
For any questions on this decision, please contact Ty Halpin (Playing Rules,
thalpin@ncaa.org) or Cameron Schuh (Public and Media Relations,
cschuh@ncaa.org) at the NCAA. Thank you for your attention to this matter.
JH:clm
cc: Mr. Gene McArtor
Baseball Rules Committee
Selected NCAA Staff Members